The Easiest & Biggest Mistake You Can Make With Your Logo

April 21, 2016


Once upon a time, the process of developing fonts was an intensive process, involving the creation of typefaces carved in metal that would be purchased by print publishers and carried in a box until their use. Pages would be carefully preset, then covered in ink and pressed onto paper. Nowadays, using a particular font is a lot less difficult. Designers and typographers create typefaces using design software, which is then accessible for people all over the world. In fact, many typefaces come preloaded onto your computer, and you can purchase additional fonts at low or no cost, which can then be used without lugging, setting, and more! Simply clicking on a type you like and using it can be done almost intuitively.However, with so much saturation of fonts, there are some that show up over and over. Whether programmed into a word processor or having a surge in popularity. Fonts such as Times New Roman, Helvetica, and Comic Sans are seen over and over. While in some contexts these are great choices, for others they are not the best to use. While choosing the right typeface for your brand is one crucial component that involves consideration, there are some fonts that would many any designer cringe to use. 

Fonts to Avoid When Branding

Commonly Used Fonts to Avoid When Branding

There are reasons why fonts were developed, and many have justly served their purpose over the years. With an oversaturation of these particular designs in the market, it just makes designers, well, shudder, when a client suggests these fonts for their design. If you love a font on this list- don’t fret! Normally, a designer will be able to find an innovative and unique substitute for something you see all of the time while preserving what you love about the font to begin with. Just ask!

Fonts that give your designer a fever dream of monsters chasing them naked before they need to give their high school graduation speech (or whatever keeps them up at night) include:

  • Arial
  • Ecofont
  • Papyrus
  • Copperplate Gothic
  • Courier
  • Hobo
  • Brush Script
  • Curlz
  • Bradley Hand
  • Zapfino
  • Trajan
  • Impact

Why do some fonts seem to draw the intense ire of designers? Usually, it’s because they are very available across devices, and since people have so much access to them, they are used over and over. A font like Arial is actually a nice font! But, with less access to other fonts, Arial pops up often, usually as a go-to font. Just because a font is easily accessible doesn’t mean that this is the best possible one for you to use.

Not many people search for font alternatives, which can be exactly what it takes to take your brand to the next level. Looking for fonts outside of what is traditionally offered? There are many ways to find alternative, new, and different fonts that are able to embody what you love about the originals you are used to while making you stand out from the pack.