5 Lessons to Learn About Personal Branding 

February 07, 2017


Maybe you don’t have a small business. Maybe you’re just thinking about defining yourself personally and professionally. Does this mean that you shouldn’t invest time and effort into your personal brand and logo design? Personal branding understands that opportunities can arise based on how the world recognizes you, and the best words, colors, images, themes, and more to make this happen. Consider your favorite celebrity, for example. What is it that makes you respect them more than others? What do you really like about them? How much of that do you think relates to their true, core personality versus the brand that they’ve portrayed to the public? Likely, a lot of branding has gone into their appearances that help to make them loved.

When You Are Your Brand

A lot of writing goes into how a small business can brand itself, but how can a personal brand apply these same lessons?

  • Focus on the difference between you and others
    • What makes you special? There is something about you that draws people in and makes them feel comfortable. This difference is the key that helps to make you stand out, and one of the things that you’re able to highlight and build your personal brand upon.
  • Manage your social media like a business would
    • Personal branding also involves a level of restraint. In many instances, you’re used to saying whatever you’d like on social media, but when you’re building a personal brand, these interactions need to be monitored. This also means that you need to have your own, defined voice.
  • Remain authentic and true to yourself
    • Know what won’t work in the long run? Pretending to be something that you’re not. It might work at first, but after a while, you won’t be able to keep up the jig. Being inauthentic can cause people to lose their trust in your work and brand, even if it’s personal.
  • Don’t expect to be a brand overnight
    • Like with any business, branding is constant, continual, and not immediate by any means. This usually also means that it needs to be refined and honed – if you created a brand a year ago, it’s probably worth it to take another look at what this means and how you’re affected.
  • Take the time to invest in yourself
    • Don’t just create a logo for yourself and leave it as that. Whatever you’d like your brand to focus on, you’ll want to invest in yourself. What are you an expert in? What do you want to hone? Personal development is only one part of building your personal brand.

Importantly, there is not one, perfect way to establish a personal brand, but there are best practices. Establishing your differences, your voice, and then remaining authentic to this are naturally crucial steps, but investing in yourself is equally essential. When you’re representing yourself and selling this to others, you’ll need to show your reliability and trustworthiness – establishing your brand as the go-to voice for your expertise. Your logo is one part of this and can be a great starting point to help define your own personal brand.